Located off the Southern Coast of Africa, Madagascar is the fourth biggest island in the world. Due to its geographic isolation, the island is famous for its distinct plants and wildlife found nowhere else on the planet. Madagascar is famous for its lemurs which have thrived in that location due to a lack of competition from other species. This varied flora and fauna faces endangerment from human development and interaction, with almost 90% of its forested area already lost to agricultural practices that are native to the inhabitants. Forestry, agriculture, and fishing are the mainstay of Madagascar economy, which accounts for over one-fourth of the nation’s GDP and for employing about 80% of the entire population. Madagascar has also experienced political instability including a coup, disputed elections, and violent unrest.

Madagascar has a population of 25 million with major ethnic groups including Malayo-Indonesian, Cotiers, Indian, French, Comoran, and Creole. Most Malagasy are multi-ethnic, reflecting the nation’s diversity. The primary languages of Madagascar include both French and Malagasy and the majority of its people are Christians, Muslim, or Indigenous religionists.

Average Monthly Earnings

Employment-to-Population Ratio

Unemployment Rate

Employment by Sector

Agriculture 74.5%
Industry 9.2%
Services 16.1%

Employment Distribution by Education

Age 15+

Less than Basic 26.8%
Basic 54.7%
Intermediate 14.0%
Advanced 4.5%
Level Not Stated 0%

Age 15-24

Less than Basic 22.0%
Basic 58.1%
Intermediate 17.2%
Advanced 2.8%
Level Not Stated 0%

Age 15-64

Less than Basic 26.2%
Basic 54.8%
Intermediate 14.4%
Advanced 4.7%
Level Not Stated 0%

Age 25+

Less than Basic 28.7%
Basic 53.4%
Intermediate 12.9%
Advanced 5.1%
Level Not Stated 0%

Schedule a Demo

In Romania, starting January 1, 2023, pensioners of the public pension system and beneficiaries whose monthly income is less than or equal to RON 3,000 are eligible for financial aid. #Romania #ComplianceUpdates #GlobalCompliance #GlobalPeopleStrategist

In Luxembourg, the maximum working time cannot exceed 10 hours per day or 48 hours per week. #Luxembourg #ComplianceUpdates #GlobalCompliance #GlobalPeopleStrategist

In Luxembourg, employees must be employed by an organization with the capacity for remote work to request the option. Any employee of a Luxembourg company governed by private law hired under a fixed-term or indefinite-term contract can participate in telework. #ComplianceUpdates

In El Salvador, teleworking is strictly voluntary for both the employee and employer, and there must be a written agreement between the parties where the terms and conditions are established. #ElSalvador #ComplianceUpdates #GlobalCompliance #GlobalPeopleStrategist

In Burundi, labor law provides 20 days of paid annual leave (one and two-thirds of a day for every month of service) after completing 12 months of continuous service. Employees have the right to accumulate annual leave for 2 years. #Burundi #ComplianceUpdates #GlobalCompliance

Load More...